Tag Archives: Outfest

The Shiny Shrimps

The Shiny Shrimps, Gay Essential Talks to Cédric Le Gallo

The Shiny Shrimps (Les crevettes pailletées) has been a box office hit in France, and has provoked debate on the issue of homophobia in sport. “It was a huge debate in France. I did the cover of L’Equipe, which is the main sports magazine in France. They did something brave by publishing a cover showing me and my teammate kissing each other, and some of the readers of the magazine responded negatively, saying they’d never buy the magazine anymore.”

Bit

Gay Essential Review: Bit at Outfest

It’s scathing and satirical as it sinks its teeth into predatory men and far right conspiracy theorists, providing the broadest dark laughs while offering something far more groundbreaking for the vampire genre below such surface pleasures. It’s a humble film that has no intention above making horror fans howl in delight – but on closer inspection, it’s clear that it deserves far more credit than a film in this style is likely to receive.

Billie and Emma

Billie And Emma, Gay Essential Talks to Samantha Lee

Billie and Emma, revolves around the romance shared by two teenage girls. In its charming simplicity, this touching comedy drama touches on delicate themes, such as homosexuality, teenage pregnancy, religion and the education system. Furthermore, while it carries on the director’s work of advocating for better representation of women and LGBTQ+ in her local cinema, it also speaks to an international audience.

Kanarie

Gay Essential Review: Kanarie at Outfest

With a growing number of queer topics and motion pictures emerging in South African filmmaking, the status quo is being increasingly questioned and dismantled. Kanarie, tackles a variety of controversial subjects, from blind patriotism to the effects of religious dogma on sexuality and healthy self-expression.

Bitter Melon

Gay Essential Review: Bitter Melon at Outfest

Only a brilliant and gifted director can manage to make grueling topics like domestic abuse mesh well with dry humor and dramedy. Albeit slipping out of its vision and losing its prowess at times, Bitter Melon brings a genuinely refreshing and satisfying experience on the screens of this year’s Outfest edition.

Call Her Ganda

Gay Essential Review: Call Her Ganda at Outfest

Following one of the most gut-wrenching events in the history of the Filipino trans movement, Call Her Ganda is a staggering and thought-provoking documentary on the epidemic of violence against LGBTQ people. Part-chronicle, part-tribute, the film is ushered by three central female figures who take on a seemingly never-ending and irremediable quest for justice.

Santa & Andrés

Gay Essential Review: Santa & Andrés at Outfest

Set in 1983, the film depicts the growing friendship between gay writer Andrés (Eduardo Martinez), who has been banned from writing due to writing a subversive anti-government book, and the revolutionary woman (Lola Amores) tasked with keeping an eye on him for three days while a major event takes place down in their village.

Rebels on Pointe

Gay Essential Review: Rebels on Pointe at Outfest

Documentarian Bobbi Jo Hart’s new film Rebels on Pointe follows Les Ballets Trockadero on a world tour, discovering their worldwide fanbases and the artists behind the make-up. Despite being set in a drag inspired world, this feels as removed from the bitchiness associated with that culture as possible, as we find genuine warmth and affection between all group members.

God’s Own Country

Gay Essential Review: God’s Own Country at Outfest

If Ang Lee taught us anything, it’s that you can have intimacy and affection in the most rugged and wildest of places. With inevitable comparisons to Brokeback Mountain swarming the critics’ reviews after the movie’s premiere, God’s Own Country brings back that picturesque and rowdy feel, but certainly doesn’t stop there. This is a bittersweet testament of gay love in the countryside that screened at this year’s Outfest LGBT festival edition.

A Date for Mad Mary

Gay Essential Review: A Date for Mad Mary at Outfest

The perfectly cast Seana Kerslake takes an occasionally unappealing character and makes us want to give her the same recurrent chances as the other characters in the film. And there are some delightfully unexpected moments – largely stemming from Mary’s penchant for jeopardizing or even ruining whatever good things come her way.

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