Tag Archives: Outfest

Santa & Andrés

Film Review: Santa & Andrés at Outfest

Set in 1983, the film depicts the growing friendship between gay writer Andrés (Eduardo Martinez), who has been banned from writing due to writing a subversive anti-government book, and the revolutionary woman (Lola Amores) tasked with keeping an eye on him for three days while a major event takes place down in their village.

Rebels on Pointe

Film Review: Rebels on Pointe at Outfest

Documentarian Bobbi Jo Hart’s new film Rebels on Pointe follows Les Ballets Trockadero on a world tour, discovering their worldwide fanbases and the artists behind the make-up. Despite being set in a drag inspired world, this feels as removed from the bitchiness associated with that culture as possible, as we find genuine warmth and affection between all group members.

God’s Own Country

Film Review: God’s Own Country at Outfest

If Ang Lee taught us anything, it’s that you can have intimacy and affection in the most rugged and wildest of places. With inevitable comparisons to Brokeback Mountain swarming the critics’ reviews after the movie’s premiere, God’s Own Country brings back that picturesque and rowdy feel, but certainly doesn’t stop there. This is a bittersweet testament of gay love in the countryside that screened at this year’s Outfest LGBT festival edition.

A Date for Mad Mary

Film Review: A Date for Mad Mary at Outfest

The perfectly cast Seana Kerslake takes an occasionally unappealing character and makes us want to give her the same recurrent chances as the other characters in the film. And there are some delightfully unexpected moments – largely stemming from Mary’s penchant for jeopardizing or even ruining whatever good things come her way.

Discreet

Film Review: Discreet at Outfest

Jonny Mars plays Alex, a drifter who wades back in to his hometown with the aim of confronting the man who abused him sexually as a child. Upon tracking down his former abuser, finding that he is frail and crippled with physical and mental illness, his original vengeance quest is paused and he continues to lead an existence outside of mainstream society. He is, after all, a man of few words, devoting his free time to either making money pimping himself or other people out- and it should be noted, although this issue is handled with surprising restraint, that the sexual partners he tends to visit are all significantly older men, which could be interpreted as a reason for his relationship with his abuser to become more complicated.

El Canto de Colibri

Film Review: El Canto de Colibri at Outfest

El Canto de Colibri is a study in love and acceptance that should be used at every PFLAG meeting, religious conference, parenting class and political campaign. And though the documentary is in Spanish with English subtitles and subjects of varying Latino descent, every ethnic group can draw something from this documentary whether as a parent, a child, a politician, a clergyman, a sociologist or otherwise.

Film Review: The Watermelon Woman at Outfest

The Watermelon Woman is one of the first films (if not THE first) about a black lesbian that is written, directed and produced by a black lesbian. As such, it not only takes on the rather uncomfortable topics of opportunities for black women in film, the portrayals of black women in film and the place of black women in the ongoing history of film, but approaches them from a uniquely personal perspective.

Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church

Film Review: Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church at Outfest

Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church premiered on BET’s digital platform in late 2015 and was screened at the White House in early 2016. It received such a rousing response at Outfest’s Fusion LGBT People of Color Film Festival in March of 2016 that Outfest organizers included it in the lineup for their main event a few months later.

Miles

Film Review: Miles at Outfest

Written and directed by Nathan Adloff, Miles is a largely autobiographical film set in 1999 about a gay high school senior (the very well-cast Tim Boardman) who is itching to kick the dust of the small Illinois town he grew up in off his shoes and head to Chicago for college.

I Love You Both

Film Review: I Love You Both at Outfest

Imagine meeting a fun and flirtatious 20-something named Andy. He’s charming, handsome, has great taste in music. Now imagine finding yourself in a love triangle with Andy…and your twin sibling. While this might sound like the plotline from a really bad porno, this is actually the feature film debut by the dynamic twin sibling writing and acting duo, Doug and Kristin Archibald.

Being 17

Film Review: Being 17 (Quand on a 17 ans) at Outfest

Two 17-year-old boys go to the same high school – where they all but terrorize each other. What’s a mother to do? She unknowingly invites the aggressor to live with them temporarily while his mother recovers from an illness at a nearby hospital.

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