Tag Archives: BFI London Film Festival

Abu: Father

Film Review – Abu: Father at BFI London Film Festival

Less a documentary and more an unflinchingly personal essay, director Arshad Khan’s Abu: Father is moving and harrowing in equal measure. Utilising home video footage he has amassed since his childhood in Pakistan in the seventies, as well as scenes from the pop culture that played a pivotal role throughout the important stages of his life, Khan’s film deals with his lifelong struggle with his own sexuality and his relationship with his religiously conservative family.

A Moment In The Reeds

Film Review: A Moment In The Reeds at BFI London Film Festival

Receiving its world premiere at the BFI London Film Festival, A Moment in the Reeds is the first ever Finnish LGBT romance film, following in the footsteps of some of the best gay love stories of recent years to forge a believable tale of two men thrown together by chance, forging an instant, deep connection with each other across the space of a few days.

The Cakemaker

Film Review: The Cakemaker (Der Kuchenmacher) at BFI London Film Festival

On paper, the storyline to The Cakemaker sounds every bit as elegantly twisted as The Talented Mr Ripley, as a German baker integrates himself in to the life of his deceased lover’s wife in Jerusalem, building a deep connection with her while never disclosing the truth about his relationship with her other half.

Call Me By Your Name

Film Review: Call Me By Your Name at BFI London Film Festival

Adapted from Andre Aciman’s novel by legendary writer/director James Ivory, and directed by the surely soon to be legendary Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino, the film takes a classic coming of age premise within LGBT fiction and transforms it into something extraordinary and infinitely heartfelt.

Taekwondo

Film Review: Taekwondo at BFI London Film Festival

My first acquaintance with Argentinian filmmaker Marco Berger goes back to spring 2014 when his exquisitely understated gay romance Hawaii screened at the BFI Flare, London LGBT Film Festival. Fair warning: if you’ve seen that film and found the whole “will they/won’t they” tension a bit frustrating, you might have a hard time stomaching Taekwondo’s incredibly protracted relationship tease. Berger in fact reprises the same kind of core tension in this newest effort, albeit the story and the whole context that feed such tension are rather different.

The Pass

Film Review: The Pass at BFI London Film Festival

The Pass spans 15 years through the rise and fall of a closeted footballer: it starts off on the cusp of his career breakthrough, follows him across the glory period where his personal troubles threaten to compromise his success and eventually, as the past catches up with him, finds him bound to face the consequences of his life choices.

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