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You’re Killing Me

Essential Opinion: You’re Killing Me

George and Barnes are YouTube performers with about a thousand views. Joe is a socially awkward new fan – and also a serial killer. After “breaking up” with a guy named Andy, Joe tracks down George and the two immediately start dating. But the more they fall for each other, George’s friends become MIA for various reasons.

Call Me By Your Name

Film Review: Call Me By Your Name at BFI London Film Festival

Adapted from Andre Aciman’s novel by legendary writer/director James Ivory, and directed by the surely soon to be legendary Italian filmmaker Luca Guadagnino, the film takes a classic coming of age premise within LGBT fiction and transforms it into something extraordinary and infinitely heartfelt.

Pitchfork

Essential Opinion: Pitchfork

Set in sleepy Michigan farm country, the film features a broad cast of characters, with a small LGBT twist. Hunter, having recently come out to his parents, is making his first trip home from the big city to face his conservative father. Needing the support of his gaggle of friends, Hunter returns home with a variety of mismatched characters – a gaggle of horror film clichés who are ripe for the picking.

Jamie Marks Is Dead

Essential Opinion: Jamie Marks Is Dead

Directed and adapted by Carter Smith from Christopher Barzak’s harrowing novel One For Sorrow, Jamie Marks Is Dead is a slow-burning teen horror. A quiet teenager from a broken home’s life becomes bleak when his mother is involved in a car accident and a boy from his high school is found dead. Released in 2014 the film stars Noah Silver, Cameron Monaghan and Morgan Saylor.

The KAOS Brief

Essential Opinion: The KAOS Brief

What begins as a hactivist message quickly diverges into a clever found footage film shot with phones, security cameras, and a few DJI quadcopter drones. Drew Lipson plays Skyler, a social media-obsessed vlogger who broadcasts his daily life to his thousands of subscribers on his YouTube channel. Skyler and his partner Corey decide to kick off their spring break on a brief camping excursion with Skyler’s twin sister Dakota and her boyfriend Tren, setting up the perfect opportunity for a variety of new vlog entries, as well as a relaxing and fun getaway.

A Very Sordid Wedding

Essential Opinion: A Very Sordid Wedding

Taking place in a small Texas town, A Very Sordid Wedding is set less than a month after marriage equality becomes the law of the land across the USA. As the small town church prepares to hold an anti-equality rally, Latrell (Bonnie Bedelia), the mother of a recently married gay son, takes it in to her own hands to protest this backward event.

B&B

Essential Opinion: B&B

There’s countless LGBT horror flicks out there, but few of them can really master the subtleties and sublime terror you find in a Hitchcock classic. B&B is part of these playful, but fierce exceptions. Poking fun at some of our most beloved thriller tropes, writer and director Joe Ahearne has crafted a half-satire, half-horror film brimming with suspense, humor and unforgettable plot twists. Fair warning: although B&B isn’t for the uninitiated, you shouldn’t go into it as a horror connoisseur, but rather as a movie buff looking for a thrill.

Heartstone

Essential Opinion: Heartstone (Hjartasteinn)

With remarkable simplicity, but also depth and sensibility, Heartstone is an impeccably executed debut feature from the talented Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson and a must-see for anyone, gay or straight, that has ever known or experienced intolerance and the struggle of riotous adolescent years.

Taste of Love

Small But Perfectly Formed, Iris Prize Our Highlights

The Iris Prize is now in its 11th year and once again will showcase some of the best LGBT+ short films from around the world. Since it began in 2007, the prize has allowed filmmakers from as far afield as Australia, Israel and Brazil to produce a brand new short film in the UK, with a current budget of £30,000, thanks to the support of the Michael Bishop Foundation.

Something Like Summer

Film Review: Something Like Summer at Outfest

With a narrative spanning over a decade, director David Berry, making his feature film debut by transforming the story in to a musical, using a mix of original and famous tracks (by artists varying from Regina Spektor to Ne-Yo), that help document the increasing years and romantic entanglements of Benjamin Bentley.

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