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The KAOS Brief

Essential Opinion: The KAOS Brief

What begins as a hactivist message quickly diverges into a clever found footage film shot with phones, security cameras, and a few DJI quadcopter drones. Drew Lipson plays Skyler, a social media-obsessed vlogger who broadcasts his daily life to his thousands of subscribers on his YouTube channel. Skyler and his partner Corey decide to kick off their spring break on a brief camping excursion with Skyler’s twin sister Dakota and her boyfriend Tren, setting up the perfect opportunity for a variety of new vlog entries, as well as a relaxing and fun getaway.

A Very Sordid Wedding

Essential Opinion: A Very Sordid Wedding

Taking place in a small Texas town, A Very Sordid Wedding is set less than a month after marriage equality becomes the law of the land across the USA. As the small town church prepares to hold an anti-equality rally, Latrell (Bonnie Bedelia), the mother of a recently married gay son, takes it in to her own hands to protest this backward event.

B&B

Essential Opinion: B&B

There’s countless LGBT horror flicks out there, but few of them can really master the subtleties and sublime terror you find in a Hitchcock classic. B&B is part of these playful, but fierce exceptions. Poking fun at some of our most beloved thriller tropes, writer and director Joe Ahearne has crafted a half-satire, half-horror film brimming with suspense, humor and unforgettable plot twists. Fair warning: although B&B isn’t for the uninitiated, you shouldn’t go into it as a horror connoisseur, but rather as a movie buff looking for a thrill.

Heartstone

Essential Opinion: Heartstone (Hjartasteinn)

With remarkable simplicity, but also depth and sensibility, Heartstone is an impeccably executed debut feature from the talented Guðmundur Arnar Guðmundsson and a must-see for anyone, gay or straight, that has ever known or experienced intolerance and the struggle of riotous adolescent years.

Taste of Love

Small But Perfectly Formed, Iris Prize Our Highlights

The Iris Prize is now in its 11th year and once again will showcase some of the best LGBT+ short films from around the world. Since it began in 2007, the prize has allowed filmmakers from as far afield as Australia, Israel and Brazil to produce a brand new short film in the UK, with a current budget of £30,000, thanks to the support of the Michael Bishop Foundation.

Something Like Summer

Film Review: Something Like Summer at Outfest

With a narrative spanning over a decade, director David Berry, making his feature film debut by transforming the story in to a musical, using a mix of original and famous tracks (by artists varying from Regina Spektor to Ne-Yo), that help document the increasing years and romantic entanglements of Benjamin Bentley.

Beach Rats

Essential Opinion: Beach Rats

Being in the closet, struggling with self acceptance and worrying about what those close to you will think, is an emotional nightmare for anybody who has been through it. In Beach Rats director Eliza Hittman’s sophomore feature deals with coming out in a stylish, hyper masculine way that lays bare all the vulnerabilities of a character putting on a tough front to hide what he believes are temporary demons.

Santa & Andrés

Film Review: Santa & Andrés at Outfest

Set in 1983, the film depicts the growing friendship between gay writer Andrés (Eduardo Martinez), who has been banned from writing due to writing a subversive anti-government book, and the revolutionary woman (Lola Amores) tasked with keeping an eye on him for three days while a major event takes place down in their village.

Jesus

Essential Opinion: Jesús

Jésus is a lower middle-class teenager from the suburbs of Santiago del Chile going through a lot of changes while growing into a man. He maintains a tense and reticent relationship with his father, Hector who he sees only a few times a month. After Jésus’s mother dies, both father and son seem to struggle to get along. They begin reshaping a relationship whose foundation was never really solid.

The Fabulous Allan Carr

Film Review: The Fabulous Allan Carr at Outfest

Allan Carr was an outspoken, flamboyant personality who remained constantly in vocal opposition to the kinds of films Hollywood was making during the seventies – something he fought back against by producing Grease, the highest grossing musical of all time and a zeitgeist capturing sensation to this very day.

Rebels on Pointe

Film Review: Rebels on Pointe at Outfest

Documentarian Bobbi Jo Hart’s new film Rebels on Pointe follows Les Ballets Trockadero on a world tour, discovering their worldwide fanbases and the artists behind the make-up. Despite being set in a drag inspired world, this feels as removed from the bitchiness associated with that culture as possible, as we find genuine warmth and affection between all group members.

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