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But I’m A Cheerleader

Gay Essential Films To Watch, But I’m A Cheerleader

A classic satire in gay cinema, But I’m A Cheerleader is a feature film which was released in 1999. Written by Brian Wayne Peterson and directed by Jamie Babbit, the romantic comedy follows the story of a young lesbian cheerleader who is sent by her parents to conversion therapy. The film stars Natasha Lyonne and features Michelle Williams, Clea DuVall and RuPaul among many others.

Bent

Gay Essential Films To Watch, Bent

Bent was released in 1997 and won awards at Cannes Film Festival. Gijon International Film Festival and Torino International Gay and Lesbian Film Festival. The film screen play was written by Martin Sherman adapted from his play. Directed by Sean Mathias, the star filled cast included Lothaire Bluteau, Clive Owen, Mick Jagger, Jude Law and Ian McKellen. Filing took place in Ayrshire, Scotland and Tring, UK.

Hello Again

Essential Opinion: Hello Again

For his third feature length effort, director Tom Gustafson has made the ambitious decision to adapt acclaimed off-Broadway musical Hello Again for the big screen. Michael John LaChiusa’s rapturously received stage production details several different romantic encounters, across a 100 year period, all linked together via thematically recurring details in the lyrics and dialogue between the different partners.

Radiant Sea

Gay Essential Films To Watch, Radiant Sea (Lichtes Meer)

Released in 2015, Radiant Sea (Lichtes Meer) was written by Jan Künemund and Stefan Butzmühlen and is based on a novel entitled An Iceland Fisherman, by French author Pierre Loti. The film follows the story of a trainee on a freighter. Starring Martin Sznur, Jules Sagot and Katharina Melchior, the motion picture was directed by Stefan Butzmühlen.

Princess Cyd

Essential Opinion: Princess Cyd

Have you ever experienced a quiet, selfless moment of peace with someone you care about that seems boundless and out-of-this-world? Not that neurotic kind of affection that we call love, but rather a warm space that needs nothing and gracefully offers everything to the other person. If you have, Stephen Cone’s brilliant 2017 drama film will remind you of what that feels like. If you haven’t, you’ll be dying to re-watch Princess Cyd just so you can get another glimpse of this unique and humbling feeling.

The Wound

Film Review: The Wound (Inxeba) at Cambridge Film Festival

Despite dealing with ritual circumcision in the Xhosa community, a long standing hot button topic in South African culture (Nelson Mandela himself went through the same initiation process outlined here), director John Trengrove’s film is refreshingly not an “issue movie”.

Salvation Army

Gay Essential Films To Watch, Salvation Army (L’armée du salut)

Written and directed by Abdellah Taïa, this film follows the life of a young homosexual man from Morocco who is part of a traditional, working-class family. Salvation Army (L’armée du salut) was released in 2013 and is based on Taïa’s autobiographical novel. The debut film stars Karim Ait M’Hand, Said Mrini and Amine Ennaji.

BPM (Beats Per Minute)

Film Review: BPM (Beats Per Minute) at Cambridge Film Festival

BPM (Beats Per Minute) is a fiercely angry and impassioned work of political cinema that is vibrant, sometimes hilarious and frequently tearjerking – and most importantly, it is unapologetically queer in a way so few films on the AIDS crisis allow themselves to be. This is a film squarely focused on documenting a moment in history for gay audiences, offering concessions to straight viewers only in the sense that it offers them a chance to showcase basic empathy and be moved by a story that deals with a culture they won’t be able to relate to.

Soldatii. Poveste din Ferentari

Essential Opinion: Soldiers. Story From Ferentari (Soldatii. Poveste din Ferentari)

Romanian films have become one of the most compelling and noteworthy developments in international cinema over the last few years, maintaining a remarkable monopoly over the Cannes Film Festival. Invariably drawing on the legacy of a lengthy and painful communist junket, Ivana Mladenovic’s controversial and rough-hewn motion picture does not disappoint – tackling dark topics like abuse, poverty and dysfunctional love, the drama film is unapologetically blunt and does little to cover up the harsh reality of living in one of Romania’s most gruesome suburbs.

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