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The Fabulous Allan Carr

The Fabulous Allan Carr, Gay Essential Talks To Jeffrey Schwarz

“The Fabulous Allan Carr tells Allan’s story,” Jeffrey Schwarz explains. “But it’s also a social history of gay life from the 50s when little gay boys would channel their obsessions through movies and would worship glamorous movie queens through the 70s when people started coming out of the closet through the 80s when AIDS came along and ruined the party for everyone. That’s sort of the backdrop of Allan’s story.”

Rift

Film Review: Rift (Rökkur) at Outfest

It’s not every day that you see a gay-themed horror film, particularly not one which is expressly ravishing and has stunning cinematography. Although there is plenty of homosexual subtext in some of the greatest horror classics, and even in the more recently produced sequels, having a slow-burning thriller which keeps you on the edge of your seat and is also centered on gay men is a rather new and lavishly entertaining addition on the big screen.

Behind the Curtain: Todrick Hall

Behind the Curtain, Gay Essential Talks To Katherine Fairfax Wright and Todrick Hall

Katherine Fairfax Wright didn’t know who Todrick Hall was. So when a friend at Awesomeness Films called her about directing a documentary about him, she was initially hesitant until she looked him up and checked out his wildly popular YouTube channel.

Paths

Film Review: Paths (Ein Weg) at Outfest

Paths, the feature directorial debut from Chris Miera, initially introduces itself as a low key relationship drama, navigating the turbulent long term partnership between Andreas (Mike Hoffman) and Martin (Mathis Reinhardt) as they adjust to life now their 19 year old son has flown the nest.

Check It

Film Review: Check It at the Human Rights Art and Film Festival

Most of the members of Check It are estranged from their families or have otherwise disadvantageous home lives. A lot of them are homeless and many of them turn to prostitution in order to pay rent, eat or just survive. But what else are they supposed to do? When they get kicked out of their homes as young teenagers simply for being different and/or kicked out of school at an even younger age because of perceived behavioral problems, what other recourse do these undereducated black LGBT teenagers have?

The Freedom to Marry

Film Review: The Freedom to Marry at the Human Rights Arts and Film Festival

April DeBoer and Jayne Rouse live in Michigan. Between them, they have FIVE adopted children. They couldn’t legally adopt all five jointly because the laws of the state prohibit unmarried couples from adopting. But being a lesbian couple, they couldn’t get married anyway because same-sex marriage wasn’t legal in their state. This leaves their family very vulnerable to being split up should something happen to one or both of them.

Waiting for B.

Film Review: Waiting for B. at XPOSED International Queer Film Festival

“We were born to be Beyonce fans.” When you find your calling in life, you do it on purpose. These men and women waited two months in line, camped outside a football stadium for a chance to glance at Queen B more closely. You may expect to see a film about celebrity culture, obsessive fans, or Beyonce herself seen through the eyes of those who know her persona best. You’ll end up watching a smartly done account of sexism, identity, human sexuality, homophobia, consumption, and celebrity.

La Noche

Film Review: La Noche at XPOSED International Queer Film Festival

What stands between mundane everyday life and tomorrow’s hangover? La Noche, narrates the sexual adventures of a man who navigates the prostitution underworld of Buenos Aires. For company, he has only drugs, prostitutes, and the incessant solitude that pushes him time and again towards the next fuck, the next shot, the next adventure.

Free CeCe

Film Review: Free CeCe at BFI Flare

With increasing political and social justice movements emerging and the trans community receiving more and more pop culture exposure, you might begin to think that going against the grain of society’s gender compliances is not only accepted nowadays, but also praised and somewhat glamorized. Unfortunately, for many LGBTQ members this is merely another glorified media representation that has little to do with the reality of what trans people encounter and deal with on a daily basis.

Body Electric

Film Review: Body Electric (Corpo Elétrico) at BFI Flare

Marcelo Caetano is a newcomer, but ambitious feature director who has a fascinating approach to gay cinema and LGBTQ relationships. His debut, Body Electric, is a candid and tender tribute to Brazil’s racial and sexual heterogeneity, as well as an unbridled, sincere addition to this year’s BFI Flare Festival.

Handsome Devil

Film Review: Handsome Devil at BFI Flare

With Handsome Devil, writer/director John Butler, reprises the poignant reflection on the meaning of masculinity he had explored in his fun 2013 debut The Stag (aka The Bachelor Party) but this time he takes the diatribe back to high school – a rugby-obsessed, all-boys boarding school to be precise – and by his own admission infuses the story with inevitable autobiographical references.

Center Of My World

Film Review: Center Of My World (Die Mitte der Welt) at BFI Flare

There’s nothing quite as enticing as this year’s BFI Festival selection – Center Of My World, along with its fascinating cinematography, remains one of my personal favorites due to its candid and refreshing approach to gay relationships, as well as its memorable and enveloping performances. Despite using a teenagey framework, which could have easily diverted the film into a bland kitsch romance, Erwa sets the bar high and proves that any type of setting can be molded into a masterpiece with the right tools and sensibility.

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