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Boys for Sale

Boys For Sale (売買ボーイズ), Gay Essential Talks To Ian Thomas Ash

Boys for Sale (売買ボーイズ) interviews several current and past sex workers about how they got into the sex industry, why they chose this work, their experiences as such and their life plans for once they move on from it – or, if they’re no longer working as such, what they’ve done since. The reasons are surprising and the stories are compelling – though at times, some are also bit sad and others even heartbreaking.

Santa & Andrés

Film Review: Santa & Andrés at Outfest

Set in 1983, the film depicts the growing friendship between gay writer Andrés (Eduardo Martinez), who has been banned from writing due to writing a subversive anti-government book, and the revolutionary woman (Lola Amores) tasked with keeping an eye on him for three days while a major event takes place down in their village.

The Fabulous Allan Carr

Film Review: The Fabulous Allan Carr at Outfest

Allan Carr was an outspoken, flamboyant personality who remained constantly in vocal opposition to the kinds of films Hollywood was making during the seventies – something he fought back against by producing Grease, the highest grossing musical of all time and a zeitgeist capturing sensation to this very day.

Rebels on Pointe

Film Review: Rebels on Pointe at Outfest

Documentarian Bobbi Jo Hart’s new film Rebels on Pointe follows Les Ballets Trockadero on a world tour, discovering their worldwide fanbases and the artists behind the make-up. Despite being set in a drag inspired world, this feels as removed from the bitchiness associated with that culture as possible, as we find genuine warmth and affection between all group members.

God’s Own Country

Film Review: God’s Own Country at Outfest

If Ang Lee taught us anything, it’s that you can have intimacy and affection in the most rugged and wildest of places. With inevitable comparisons to Brokeback Mountain swarming the critics’ reviews after the movie’s premiere, God’s Own Country brings back that picturesque and rowdy feel, but certainly doesn’t stop there. This is a bittersweet testament of gay love in the countryside that screened at this year’s Outfest LGBT festival edition.

The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson

Film Review: The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson at East End Film Festival

The LGBT history and the fight for equality is sadly filled with hatred, animosity and prejudice from the outside world, as well as a whole host of seemingly insurmountable obstacles – but how many of us know of the bad blood and bitterness that went on inside the gay rights movement between actual queer folks and transgender people? The Death And Life Of Marsha P. Johnson offers a unique perspective on liberation for gender nonconforming individuals and is an imperative documentary for anyone looking to fully understand the origins and evolution of the LGBT movement.

A Date for Mad Mary

Film Review: A Date for Mad Mary at Outfest

The perfectly cast Seana Kerslake takes an occasionally unappealing character and makes us want to give her the same recurrent chances as the other characters in the film. And there are some delightfully unexpected moments – largely stemming from Mary’s penchant for jeopardizing or even ruining whatever good things come her way.

4 Days In France

Film Review: Four Days in France (Jours de France) at Outfest

Invariably at every film festival there’s one or two films that don’t get as much festival buzz around them and somehow go under the radar. This is definitely the case for Four Days in France of this year’s Outfest edition. Combining Rimbaud poems, art, anonymous sex, classical music and the notorious dating app Grindr, Jérôme Reybaud’s debut is undoubtedly a daring, but impressive addition to gay cinema.

Discreet

Film Review: Discreet at Outfest

Jonny Mars plays Alex, a drifter who wades back in to his hometown with the aim of confronting the man who abused him sexually as a child. Upon tracking down his former abuser, finding that he is frail and crippled with physical and mental illness, his original vengeance quest is paused and he continues to lead an existence outside of mainstream society. He is, after all, a man of few words, devoting his free time to either making money pimping himself or other people out- and it should be noted, although this issue is handled with surprising restraint, that the sexual partners he tends to visit are all significantly older men, which could be interpreted as a reason for his relationship with his abuser to become more complicated.

Sodom

Film Review: Sodom at the East End Film Festival

A naked young man with a tinted face stands handcuffed to a lamp post in some alley in Berlin. He does not plead for help, nor does he cry in despair; he is simply uncomfortable with the bizarre situation he finds himself in. A mature man in a suit walks by and finds this fragile young man, who seems to have gone through some hazing ritual or bullying, and helps him out. They both go to the older man’s apartment, where they end up spending the night together.

The Fabulous Allan Carr

The Fabulous Allan Carr, Gay Essential Talks To Jeffrey Schwarz

“The Fabulous Allan Carr tells Allan’s story,” Jeffrey Schwarz explains. “But it’s also a social history of gay life from the 50s when little gay boys would channel their obsessions through movies and would worship glamorous movie queens through the 70s when people started coming out of the closet through the 80s when AIDS came along and ruined the party for everyone. That’s sort of the backdrop of Allan’s story.”

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