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Call Her Ganda

Film Review: Call Her Ganda at Outfest

Following one of the most gut-wrenching events in the history of the Filipino trans movement, Call Her Ganda is a staggering and thought-provoking documentary on the epidemic of violence against LGBTQ people. Part-chronicle, part-tribute, the film is ushered by three central female figures who take on a seemingly never-ending and irremediable quest for justice.

Man Made

Film Review: Man Made at Outfest

The public perception of bodybuilding is currently defined by the idea of warped masculinity – a heteronormative activity exclusively for men who take more steroids daily than they have braincells in total. It’s not entirely clear how media representation of bodybuilders has, in the past few decades, gone from presenting them as idealised men to cultural laughing stocks, but T. Cooper’s documentary Man Made is set to send stereotypes back in the opposite direction.

For Izzy

For Izzy, Gay Essential talks to Alex Chu

For Izzy, writer-director Alex Chu’s latest film, is a story of broken people who find strength through fellowship. It is the story of retired divorcee Anna, and her lesbian daughter Dede, struggling with addiction, whose lives change after they move next door to a lonely widowed father, and his autistic daughter, Laura.

Golden Boy

Film Review: Golden Boy at FilmOut San Diego

With a story so detailed that it feels autobiographical, this earthy, natural drama can’t help but catch the audience by surprise as it pushes the characters through a series of intense situations. Golden Boy, is a strongly personal variation on the usual story of a young man who ends up lost on the streets of Los Angeles.

Devil's Path

Film Review: Devil’s Path at FilmOut San Diego

You might think you know the story: two men meet at a remote cruising spot, where men have been mysteriously disappearing for weeks, and find themselves falling deeper into a murderous cat and mouse chase. But this surface level synopsis is the only true similarity between Devil’s Path and 2013’s widely acclaimed anti-thriller Stranger by the Lake, a film to which it will likely be compared based on the subject matter alone.

Every Act of Life

Film Review: Every Act of Life at FilmOut San Diego

Every Act of Life proves to be a surprisingly comprehensive documentary, effectively recounting six decades of a successful career at a brisk pace. For theatre fans, this is essential viewing – and for those of you like me, who shamefully don’t watch as many plays as they should, this is still well worth a look.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Film Review: The Miseducation of Cameron Post at Sundance London

The Miseducation of Cameron Post is set in the early nineties in Montana, but the film doesn’t wear the cultural differences separating then and now too heavily; a cassette tape here, a “Clinton/Gore” bumper sticker there, but no detail significant enough to leave the audience thinking that what we’re seeing is a relic of the past, and not something that’s unfortunately still taking place well into the 21st century.

Freelancers Anonymous

Film Review: Freelancers Anonymous at FilmOut San Diego

Freelancers Anonymous taps into the current issue of underemployment, where employers cut hours and benefits, forcing people to take multiple jobs to make ends meet. Thankfully, director Sonia Sebastian and writers Lisa Cordileone and Amy Dellagiarino never get overly serious about this, keeping things very light while grounding the humour in likeable characters.

Anything

Film Review: Anything at FilmOut San Diego

Anything is a warm and thoughtful drama that examines some very big themes without taking the usual route through them. Not only is it centred on a middle-aged man, but it also features a main character whose gender identity is never defined because it doesn’t actually matter. No, this is a film about community and belonging, and it fiercely refuses to fit in a box.

Paternal Rites

Film Review: Paternal Rites at XPOSED International Queer Film Festival

Out of all of XPOSED’s thrilling and uncanny candidates for this year’s edition, Paternal Rites is the most touching, brutal and indispensable. The international queer film festival’s heartrending addition allows us access into the troubled world of an abused child and now scarred adult who shyly and desperately seeks help to try and make sense of what happened to him.

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