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Taekwondo

Film Review: Taekwondo at BFI London Film Festival

My first acquaintance with Argentinian filmmaker Marco Berger goes back to spring 2014 when his exquisitely understated gay romance Hawaii screened at the BFI Flare, London LGBT Film Festival. Fair warning: if you’ve seen that film and found the whole “will they/won’t they” tension a bit frustrating, you might have a hard time stomaching Taekwondo’s incredibly protracted relationship tease. Berger in fact reprises the same kind of core tension in this newest effort, albeit the story and the whole context that feed such tension are rather different.

The Pass

Film Review: The Pass at BFI London Film Festival

The Pass spans 15 years through the rise and fall of a closeted footballer: it starts off on the cusp of his career breakthrough, follows him across the glory period where his personal troubles threaten to compromise his success and eventually, as the past catches up with him, finds him bound to face the consequences of his life choices.

Moonlight

Film Review: Moonlight at BFI London Film Festival

Moonlight is the harrowing story of a young black gay man raised by a single mother with a drug addiction in a rough neighbourhood of Miami, told across three chapters symbolically titled: Little, Chiron and Black – the three names our protagonist is identified with as he grows from child into teenager and eventually into fully fledged adult.

BeatCity 3

Film Review: BearCity 3 at Iris Prize Festival

BearCity 3 is a fantastic conclusion to Langway’s trilogy and quite possibly his finest example of writing, editing, and filmmaking to date. And not surprisingly, Doug Langway delivers a acknowledgement to his real life bear family – the many bears and bear lovers who have contributed to Langway’s vision over the years and continue to help him weave humorous and dramatic stories.

Small But Perfectly Formed, Iris Prize Our Highlights

2016 marks the tenth anniversary of the Iris Prize, the largest international prize available to an LGBT short filmmaker. Each winner is given a £30,000 budget to make another short film, and to date a total of seven new films have been produced and shown at film festivals around the world. This year saw a record number of films submitted for the Iris Prize, so let’s take a look at some of the best, as well as a previous winner and a film made with the prize itself.

El Canto de Colibri

Film Review: El Canto de Colibri at Outfest

El Canto de Colibri is a study in love and acceptance that should be used at every PFLAG meeting, religious conference, parenting class and political campaign. And though the documentary is in Spanish with English subtitles and subjects of varying Latino descent, every ethnic group can draw something from this documentary whether as a parent, a child, a politician, a clergyman, a sociologist or otherwise.

Film Review: The Watermelon Woman at Outfest

The Watermelon Woman is one of the first films (if not THE first) about a black lesbian that is written, directed and produced by a black lesbian. As such, it not only takes on the rather uncomfortable topics of opportunities for black women in film, the portrayals of black women in film and the place of black women in the ongoing history of film, but approaches them from a uniquely personal perspective.

Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church

Film Review: Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church at Outfest

Holler If You Hear Me: Black and Gay in the Church premiered on BET’s digital platform in late 2015 and was screened at the White House in early 2016. It received such a rousing response at Outfest’s Fusion LGBT People of Color Film Festival in March of 2016 that Outfest organizers included it in the lineup for their main event a few months later.

Miles

Film Review: Miles at Outfest

Written and directed by Nathan Adloff, Miles is a largely autobiographical film set in 1999 about a gay high school senior (the very well-cast Tim Boardman) who is itching to kick the dust of the small Illinois town he grew up in off his shoes and head to Chicago for college.

I Love You Both

Film Review: I Love You Both at Outfest

Imagine meeting a fun and flirtatious 20-something named Andy. He’s charming, handsome, has great taste in music. Now imagine finding yourself in a love triangle with Andy…and your twin sibling. While this might sound like the plotline from a really bad porno, this is actually the feature film debut by the dynamic twin sibling writing and acting duo, Doug and Kristin Archibald.

Being 17

Film Review: Being 17 (Quand on a 17 ans) at Outfest

Two 17-year-old boys go to the same high school – where they all but terrorize each other. What’s a mother to do? She unknowingly invites the aggressor to live with them temporarily while his mother recovers from an illness at a nearby hospital.

Strike a Pose

Film Review: Strike a Pose at Outfest

Though Madonna and Truth or Dare factor greatly into Strike a Pose, the film strikes a perfect balance between not becoming more about Madonna (who only appears in archival footage) than the dancers and not shying away from discussions about her and her effect on their lives then and to this very day.

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