Archive by Author

Love, Cecil

Essential Opinion: Love, Cecil

Is it possible to separate the art from the artist? Documentarian Lisa Immordino Vreeland definitely doesn’t think so, as her examination of the life and career of photographer/artist/costume designer Cecil Beaton understands that the many contradictions in his character informed a lifetime of work across a variety of different mediums.

Man Made

Film Review: Man Made at Outfest

The public perception of bodybuilding is currently defined by the idea of warped masculinity – a heteronormative activity exclusively for men who take more steroids daily than they have braincells in total. It’s not entirely clear how media representation of bodybuilders has, in the past few decades, gone from presenting them as idealised men to cultural laughing stocks, but T. Cooper’s documentary Man Made is set to send stereotypes back in the opposite direction.

Believer

Essential Opinion: Believer

At one point in HBO’s original documentary Believer, Imagine Dragons vocalist Dan Reynolds is warned that he’s going to open himself up to criticism for organising a pro-LGBTQ concert – just not predominantly from the religiously conservative, but LGBTQ people aghast at a cis-gender, heterosexual white man co-opting their struggle. This is slightly unfair, as both the film and the charity concert presented within are born of good intentions that deserve the renewed spotlight this documentary will place upon them.

Devil's Path

Film Review: Devil’s Path at FilmOut San Diego

You might think you know the story: two men meet at a remote cruising spot, where men have been mysteriously disappearing for weeks, and find themselves falling deeper into a murderous cat and mouse chase. But this surface level synopsis is the only true similarity between Devil’s Path and 2013’s widely acclaimed anti-thriller Stranger by the Lake, a film to which it will likely be compared based on the subject matter alone.

Every Act of Life

Film Review: Every Act of Life at FilmOut San Diego

Every Act of Life proves to be a surprisingly comprehensive documentary, effectively recounting six decades of a successful career at a brisk pace. For theatre fans, this is essential viewing – and for those of you like me, who shamefully don’t watch as many plays as they should, this is still well worth a look.

The Miseducation of Cameron Post

Film Review: The Miseducation of Cameron Post at Sundance London

The Miseducation of Cameron Post is set in the early nineties in Montana, but the film doesn’t wear the cultural differences separating then and now too heavily; a cassette tape here, a “Clinton/Gore” bumper sticker there, but no detail significant enough to leave the audience thinking that what we’re seeing is a relic of the past, and not something that’s unfortunately still taking place well into the 21st century.

Hearts Beat Loud

Essential Opinion: Hearts Beat Loud

Quirky American coming of age dramas aren’t exactly hard to come by – every other film that has emerged from the Sundance film festival feels like it could easily fall into this category, with very few managing to stand the test of time. Hearts Beat Loud undeniably fits into the pantheon of stereotypical “Sundance movies”, but offers something far more emotionally substantial than your run of the mill coming of age tale.

Disobedience

Essential Opinion: Disobedience

Chilean filmmaker Sebastián Lelio has quickly grown to become a major figure in world cinema, with his most internationally acclaimed titles empathetically depicting the emotional struggles of women who don’t fit into perceived societal norms. There’s no wonder he’s been labelled by many as a successor to Spanish director Pedro Almodovar, and his English language debut Disobedience only furthers that comparison.

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